eNewsletter

ISSUE NO.46
MAY 2017

Subscribe to our Newsletter


NEWS ITEMS

[1] Winners of 2017 Canadian Green Building Awards to be announced May 30
 
[2] Latest issues of SABMag and Toronto FOCUS digital just released
 
[3] New 2017 SABMag Directory adapted to LEED v4
 
[4] CHBA announces Net Zero Home Labelling Program


[5] Largest child health research tower in the world has high-performance fully glazed envelope with bird-friendly frit pattern

[6] LEED Year in Review summarizes 2016 LEED-certified projects
 
[7] Graham McGarva: Embed the value of housing affordability in sustainability
 
[8] Canada’s Largest Solar Carport to be installed at Sheridan’s Brampton Campus
 
[9] News from our partners:
 

 OUR PARTNERS

forbo flooringCPCI 


Winners of 2017 Canadian Green Building Awards to be announced May 30

 

The winning projects of the 2017 Canadian Green Building Awards will be presented on May 30 in Vancouver to kick off the opening of the CaGBC’s annual national conference, Building Lasting Change, which runs from May 30 to June 1 [www.cagbc.org/blc2017].

This is a great occasion to see some of the most leading-edge, high-performance buildings in Canada and to network with design professionals. You need not be registered for the conference to attend the Awards presentation.

There is no cost, but please RSVP to  dgriffith@sabmagazine.com

Details: May 30 from 4 pm to 5 pm at the Vancouver Convention Centre West, Room 306.


 


Latest issues of SABMag and Toronto FOCUS digital just released

The Spring issues of SABMag and the CaGBC Toronto Chapter FOCUS are available in digital format at the SABMag web site. SABMag contains the annual LEED 2016 Buildings in Review, a continuing education article on Energy Retrofits, and much more. The Toronto FOCUS issue covers the Toronto Green Standard, Transforming Toronto to a Low Carbon City, and the new One York Street building to name a few.


New 2017 SABMag Directory adapted to LEED v4

SABMag’s  2017 Directory of Sustainable Products and Services for Sustainable, High-Performance Building [link] is organized by Product Category and by LEED Category according to the new LEED v4. The Directory also offers a quick view of the structure of LEED v4, courtesy of our partner Ecospex [link], and is a quick reference for finding products. Examples of featured listings include: Tremco, Cascadia Windows & Doors, ECO Insulating Glass and EuroLine Windows.

top of page


CHBA announces Net Zero Home Labelling Program

The Canadian Home Builders’ Association [CHBA] has launched its Net Zero Home Labelling Program which recognizes Net Zero and Net Zero Ready Homes, and identifies the builders and renovators who provide them. A pilot version of the Net Zero Home Labelling Program ran from September 2015 to December 2016 to validate technical and administrative details. A national network of CHBA Net Zero Qualified Service Organizations, Energy Advisors and Trainers will work directly with the builders and renovators to design, model, test and inspect each home.
- Builders and Renovators can learn more about the Program at www.chba.ca/nze.
- Consumer information on the Program can be found at www.NetZeroHome.com.
- Information on the Net Zero Council can be found at www.chba.ca/nzc.
 


Largest child health research tower in the world has high-performance fully glazed envelope with bird-friendly frit pattern

By Mike Szabo
The story of sustainable design at the Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto has as much to do with form as function. At 21 storeys, it is the largest child health research tower in the world and represents a new typology for high-rise laboratories. It has achieved LEED Gold certification for a building type well known for its high energy demands.
A ‘whole building’ approach to sustainable design addresses five key areas of human and environmental health:
• sustainable site development that diverts 75% of waste from landfill
• water efficiency that produces a 50% reduction in water use
• energy efficiency measures that target a 38% reduction in energy use
• materials selection that includes 22.5% recycled content for new construction materials
• improved indoor environmental quality from low VOC-emitting products

This comprehensive approach was the strategy to achieve LEED Gold certification for a building type well known for its high energy demands due to high air change rates in laboratories. As sustainable infrastructure, the project is exemplary of efficient land use and high-density development that consolidates the hospital’s research programs previously dispersed throughout the Discovery District in downtown Toronto. Read the full article here.

top of page


LEED Year in Review summarizes 2016 LEED-certified projects

The 2016 LEED Year in Review, published by SABMag in partnership with the CaGBC, summarizes the LEED-certified projects in 2016, beginning with lists of all the projects organized by certification level, and then providing a selection of building profiles of some of the certified projects. The publication offers a concise overview and can be viewed here.


Graham McGarva: Embed the value of housing affordability in sustainability

A lone voice from Vancouver issued a challenge at the Greenbuild conference in Pittsburgh in 2003: “What will the US Green Building Council do to address the fact that the right building in the wrong place is the wrong building?” This was one of many factors that led USGBC to develop LEED for Neighbourhood Development [LEED-ND] to guide sustainable community development, and Vancouver’s False Creek Olympic Village was one of the first recipients of LEED-ND Platinum.  Read more …

top of page


Canada’s Largest Solar Carport to be installed at Sheridan’s Brampton Campus

Construction is set to begin this summer at Sheridan’s Davis Campus in Brampton on what will be Canada’s largest solar carport.  The project came about after the college won a contract from the FIT [Feed-in Tariff] program run by the Independent Electricity System Operator [IESO], which manages Ontario’s power system.

The FIT program was created by the IESO to promote renewable energy generation in Ontario.  Sheridan has been awarded a 20-year contract under FIT.  The 500 kilowatt [kW] project will generate approximately 700,000 kilowatt hours [kWh] of solar energy annually, or 7% of the Davis Campus’s annual usage, while saving 29 tons of emissions each year.

The project is an integral component of Sheridan’s Integrated Energy and Climate Master Plan [IECMP], which aims to decrease the college’s overall energy and carbon emissions by 50% by 2030; and Zero Waste Sheridan, which has the ambitious goal of leading Sheridan to become zero waste by 2020.

While final design is yet to be determined, the rendering by Marisa Giles depicts a potential layout of the carport, which will provide shelter for approximately 260 parking spots.  A contract to design and build the project has been awarded to UGE International Ltd. susan.atkinson@sheridancollege.ca


News from our partners

Get more information on the sustainable activities of our partners


Forbo renews biobased Marmoleum Striato collection

 

Forbo Flooring Systems’ renewed Marmoleum Striato collection presents exciting linear floor designs in a complete palette of colours, and eight beautiful, embossed Textura designs. The organic Flow and Driftwood patterns of Textura add tactility and movement to the floor. Marmoleum Striato coordinates beautifully with the other collections of Marmoleum sheet and tile, providing natural, healthy, and durable flooring solutions for healthcare, education, government, corporate and retail facilities.

Made from natural, renewable ingredients, Marmoleum Striato is 100% biobased, and features inherent antimicrobial and antistatic properties that improve indoor air quality and resist bacteria growth without chemical additives. Marmoleum Striato’s sustainable, water-based Topshield 2 finish provides occupancy-ready installation and exceptional performance against soiling, staining, scratching and scuffing. While non-renewable floor coverings may be permanently damaged, Marmoleum floor can easily and cost-effectively be renewed, and has a service life of of 30 years.

Read more ...

top of page


New guide for energy-efficient building design

The thermal performance of buildings plays an important and increasingly significant role in the energy efficiency requirements contained in Canadian building codes. Understanding and meeting these requirements has also become increasingly complex for building designers.

CPCI’s new guide, Meeting and Exceeding Building Code Thermal Performance Requirements, is a crucial resource for all designers, architects, engineers and building professionals, especially in the early stages of designing a building.

top of page